Monthly Archives: October 2017

Greetings from Cork!

Studies and School

I have been studying here in Cork Institute of Technology in Ireland now for seven weeks. The first semester lasts 13 weeks and after that there are final exams. I have chosen four courses, which are Digital Marketing Management, Digital Advertising, Emerging Markets and IT Skills for Marketing. All of the courses have been really interesting. For example we have created a digital marketing blog, professional Twitter and Facebook account and learned how to use Google Analytics. I think that these things are really important when finding a job in Finland.

Compared to Finland the lessons here are really short, only 45 minutes. It goes so fast. We have every course three times a week. Another difference, which I have noticed, is that the students always dress up in their tracksuits at school. Almost every boy wears Adidas sweatpants and girls wear some gym leggings.

The school feels a lot bigger than TAMK. Here are many different societies, anything you can think of, from karate to Muslim society. I have only assigned to international students society. They arrange really nice trips almost every weekend and the trips are really cheap.

 

Spare time

At spare time we have been to trips around Ireland. I have seen so many beautiful places here, for example Mizen Head and Blarney Castle. I also visited Dublin last weekend. The city was similar to Cork but bigger. One thing I still must see, the Cliffs of Moher.

We have also gone shopping to city and for a cup of coffee. Here are so good shops and almost every clothing store has a student discount. This should also be in Finland! In few weeks we will also visit London, which will be fun.

Olá! Greetings from Portugal!

Hello Finland!

I study to be a nurse and I wanted to do my intership in other country. So here I am, in Portugal, city called Coimbra. Sebtember and specially October have been so warm; over 30 degrees most of the days.  No complaints…

 

Work place

I work at a university hospital at the infectious department. In the ward, there is lots of different kind of patients; HIV, pneumonia, cancer, drug users etc. I have done so many different things, for example taking blood examples, treated the wounds, diluted antibiotics and I have given intravenous medication to patiens. 

 

Free time

Coimbra is pretty small city here in Portugal but still there is something to see. The university is very famous and popular. The school was built in 1290. It’s oldest school in Portugal.

Also Santa Clara bridge is beautiful. Rio Mondego- river flows through Coimbra under the Santa Clara bridge. From there you can see all those colorful buildings and beautiful landscape. 

I have travelled few times in here Portugal. I have been in Figuera da Foz and Porto. One of my classmates from Finland came here and she is living in Porto. Figuera da Foz in near to the beach. Coimbra is inland so it is nice to visit the seafront sometimes. I am planning to go to Aveiro and Lissabon soon also. 

We also booked a trip to Paeva Walkways- event. There we went to this amazing park. Paiva Walkways are located on the left bank of the Paiva River, in Arouca municipality, Aveiro. There is route what is 8 km long and that provide a walk “untouched”, surrounded by unique beauty of landscapes, in an authentic natural sanctuary along the brave waters downhills.

 

What is different

I think the ward in the hospital itself is pretty similar than in Finland. In our ward, there is 29 beds for patiens. In morning shift works five nurses, three nurse assistant and several doctors. Nurse assistans differs from our practial nurses. Nurse assistants just help nurses if they need help. They are not allowed to do anything by themselves. You don’t need any kind of education to be an assistant; you learn when you work. Here nurses do lots of things. Some wards in Finland, nurses don’t take blood samples anymore. And nurses and doctors works together. Here they doesn’t.

The hierarchy is strongly exposed. Doctors are almost like God and students are lowest ranked. Even though they said that in Finland we are quiet and shy people, still we are friendly and openminded. Here not so many are interested from students or wants to know who we are etc. They don’t speak english, even if they can. 

In general, I think here people are nice and friendly and helpful. If you ask something, at least they try to help you (sometimes they just tell anything, just to get rid of you 😀 ). And ofcourse here they are “slow” as in the West European countries. Nurses comes to work like 10mins late every day, and that’s okay. If you ask something important, they answer you “don’t worry about it”.

But still, I like Portugal. Maybe we can learn to be little more flexible and relaxed… 😉

Love,

Jonna

Nĭ hăo! Greetings from Shanghai

Studies

I chose four courses which are Foreign Trade of China, Chinese Language, Chinese Culture and China and Globalization. Every subject is held once a week except Chinese language is twice a week. The culture and language courses really help in this big city since it is really hard to find someone who speaks English. Learning about the Chinese culture is interesting because the cultural differences are so noticeable in some cases.

   Spare time

There are so much to see in Shanghai so whenever we have spare time we try to use it wisely, such as exploring the city and places. Shanghai exchange is really short which does not leave that much spare time so you must plan ahead what you would like to do. We have made plans for traveling and sightseeing. So far we have been to famous tourist attractions such as Yu Garden, Shanghai Zoo, Shanghai Museum and The Bund.

Studies – Finland vs. China

The classes in the school are longer, they last about 3,5 hours. Lectures are really similar to Finland. When it comes to the differences between Finland and China, there are not that many. Teachers don’t give assignments here and the projects are bigger and require more effort in Finland which was surprising.

Lenge siden sist!

It’s been a little while since I came back to Finland, but I still long to be back in Oslo. When I took the bus towards the airport at the end of summer 2016, I had absolutely no idea what kind of an adventure I would have in Norway.

World famous statues and views from Vigelandsparken in Oslo, Norway

I arrived in Oslo about a week before the start of my studies. I did this because I wanted to spend the week just indulging in the more touristy things, aka visiting land marks and shopping. Walking around the city was a good way to get a little more familiar with the surrounding area and the place that I would be spending the following year in. At first the city seemed huge but as I got to know it a little more, I was surprised how cozy it felt after a while. Pretty much everything was within a walking distance, which was a huge perk.

Once my 3D-graphics -studies started at Westerdals School of Arts, Communication and Technology, I was bombarded by deadlines and tasks that were challenging to say the least. One course I was interested in was unfortunately entirely in Norwegian. I told my teacher I had no issue having to translate things on my own, if I could just enroll myself. He not only enrolled me, but he actually managed to switch the course language for me, including the lectures and all study material. This just shows how hospitable Norwegians can be! Out of +40 students, the language of an entire 4 month course was changed because of one foreigner. Talk about being lucky!

I also befriended people in my class and I was able to relax and wind down with them after each school day and during weekends.  We enjoyed just hanging out by watching movies and playing games, but we also took walks on top of Grefsenkollen, which is a hill (almost a mountain) overseeing Oslo. I recommend anyone who goes to Oslo to check it out, the pictures do not do it justice!

You can see the entire dowtown of Oslo from Grefsenkollen. Climbing to the top is a great way to spend a chill sunday

I spent the first half a year living right in the city center. The school was just a few minutes of walking away and I could get pretty much anywhere in the matter of 15 minutes. This was nice, but unfortunately the noise was quite bad at times, especially during weekends. This is to be expected of course, living in the center of a capital city and all. I was, however, relieved to move to a new apartment in Ullevål at the start of 2017. I had to take a tram to get to school each day, but the environment was a lot more quiet, which was huge for me.

Tramstop near my apartment on January 2017

After a few months of staying in Oslo, I was comfortable calling it my home. The language barrier was hardly ever an issue and most people were extremely helpful and friendly towards me. The year I spent abroad was definitely one of the best years of my entire life!

Tiny cottage by Akerselva, the river that runs all the way across Oslo