Monthly Archives: May 2018

Turning Maltese

HELLOOOO!

Welcome to my Maltese adventure! It’s been an amazing ride, and definitely one of my life’s best decisions and craziest experiences. Totally recommending this programme for anyone who’s interested! Let’s get cracking!

So…. I’s my first time abroad… alone… EVER. I have only visited Sweden and Estonia when travelling outside Finland, so this has totally been an jump into the unknown. My choice to go on an exchange to Malta was a mixture of curiosity towards the southern European culture and learning practices, the need for a total change of scenery and people, and also a small wish, that I could experience some warm sunshine after a grimy winter in Finland. I’m happy to admit, that I got exactly what I wished for, and a whole lot more!

The day I landed to Malta, the weather was amazing, +20 degrees in January during the day. I was so excited and happy I couldn’t believe it. For the first time I saw the big cactus trees and southern plants in nature, and saw the Mediterranian sea. I got to experience the open and helpful nature of the Maltese people pretty soon, when getting into the bus for the first time, three people started advicing us without even asking. Also one day I had my hands full and was struggling with my glove; so a stranger looked at me and put on my glove for me without asking or saying a word. It was funny and totally unexpected, thank you, strange Maltese dude!

The temperature at night surprised me completely, because one it got dark, the temperature dropped to about 9 degrees. In an extremely humid climate that feels so so so cold. Also, the houses don’t have any heating, because they are built for the hot summer, so at night I had to sleep with 2 blankets to keep myself warm. February is considered winter in Malta, and I can see why. But it got better quite quickly.

My placements for physiotherapy practise have been

  1. Musculoskeletal outpatients unit – St Luke’s Hospital
  2. Children Development Assesment Centre (CDAU), St Luke’s Hospital
  3. Sir Anthony Mamo Oncology Center (SAMOC), Mater Dei

In musculoskeletal ward I got to assess, treat and observe patients who had various musculoskeletal issues. I had a lot of shoulder and knee patients, and I also got to see some ankle, back, neck and general mobility cases. For one day I visited the hydrotherapy pool.  I had an amazing supervisor and got so much experience by going out of my confort zone and dealing with the patients first with my supervisor, and then on my own. I was happy to get self-confidence and reassurance.

In the children’s ward the patients were mostly cases with cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome or some other syndrome, spina bifida, or children with general developmental delay. We visited the Helen Keller special school for severely disabled children/adolecents in Qrendi also every week to assess and do therapy with the students. The childer were all very adorable, and the physiotherapy with them is done always through play and games. We had nice therapy rooms full of toys and equipment, and I believe the children really liked the fun excersises we came up with.

In SAMOC we had 2 general cancer wards, haematology ward, palleative care unit, children’s ward and the outpatients ward, that we worked in. I got to experience the ward physiotherapy, and also treat patients in the outpatients unit with lymphaodema. We did complete draining therapy manually and using a PCT machine, that passively inflates a external sleeve, to get the lympf liquid moving. I got to perform manual lymph drainage on a few patients of “my own”, do measurements of the upper limb and try some assessments as well. For a few times I had a survivors gym group to instruct, that was a lot of fun and I connected with the people well! For a good-bye and thank you, some of my patients gave me gifts, which really moved me and made me extremely grateful. After work I went to the beach every day to swim and sunbathe… Can’t get better than that!!!

The work hours for me were from 8 am till 2 pm, so only 6 hours. Maltese have short work days, and because the physiotherapy is free, sometimes patients don’t bother to come, and you end up with a lot of free time on your hands. So the system is a bit different compared to Finland’s. As what comes to the physiotherapy, I think it is mostly the same in Finland as well. The Maltese university students have a 4 year degree in physiotherapy to get the bachelors degree, whereas in Finland we only have 3,5 years. The Maltese have a very good education system in physiotherapy in my opinion, they have a lot of testing, practice and training. When they graduate, the physios working for the government will do a 5 year long rotation, where they work for 6 months in a certain department, and then switch. This way every physio gets experience in all major areas of physiotherapy, f.ex. children, neurology, musculoskeletal, geriatry, and so on. I think this system would benefit many in Finland as well.

In my spare time I liked to adventure around the island; Malta is a very very small country, but there are many amazing places to see. We got to go on hikes on Sundays with a fun tour guide for only 3,5€, that covered the busrides there and back, and hiking was a fun way to spend the day, see rare sights and make new friends! I also participated to many of the offical ESN – groups fun activities, including scavenger hunting in the capitol Valletta, speed dating in the University, and a full weekend tirp with a big Erasmus group to the Malta’s sister island, Gozo. I made a big bunch of friends from all over the world!! And there was always someone to text and go out with!

I also got to participate in the University of Malta’s Student’s Fest, which is a annual, big musical made by the university students. This year we depicted the Little Mermaid, with a little twist. There was a couple of hundred people participating, and I got the opportunity to perform in the main chorus. We practiced a lot, and it all was worth it in the end, because the finished product was amazing! We had 4 shows in total, and there I got to get to know many Maltese students and see part of their University experience!

The night life in Malta is crazy and so fun. Paceville is the most popular place to go have a good time; it’s a small area full of bars and nightclubs, and it doesn’t cost anything to go in to the bars.  And the drinks are so cheap!! You can get a beer for 1 € and cocktails for 3,90€, and usually there are people handing out free drink tickets outside the bars. There are always people having a good time there, and you always bump into some people you know! And there are always some student parties around, you wont be bored, I swear!

Though there are some problems and things to grow accustomed to for example not being able to drink tap water, everything being late from buses to meetings, almost dying every day due to the crazy driving manners of the people, and LACK OF OAT BREAD AND GOOD VARIETY OF PICK AND MIX CANDY, Malta is a great place to do your exchange in. The people, the extremely active ESN-group, very professional physio supervisors and great, historical places to visit, made the experience one that I will always cherish. I truly loved the experience, 3 months was way too little for me!!

Grazzi ħafna!

Nina

Vienna – Life Around Palaces

Liebe Grüsse aus Wien!

Vienna is a beautiful city full of history and nice sceneries, and the exchange has been a great experience. The city is divided into 22 districts, which all have their own distinct air. My Praktikums (= internships) have taken place in Wilhelminenspital, a big, old hospital in the 16th district. The atmosphere at work has been great, all the physiotherapists are friendly and I have been able to take part in many different things: Laufband-training with neurological patients, Heilgymnastik for traumatology patients recovering from surgeries or accidents, pool therapy groups, mobilizing patients at hospital wards etc. In the beginning my German was quite rusty, but everyone has been very understanding and helpful with the language.

I have met people from many places, Vienna is quite multicultural. My first flatmates were from Ukraine and Hongkong, and there are have been people from USA, Latin America and all over Europe both at work and elsewhere. Cafés are an essential part of Viennese culture, people sit in them for hours working, socializing or just relaxing with the daily newspaper. There are all types of cafés, and the prices are quite affordable for a Finn. A must to try is a coffee speciality called Mélange, which basically is coffee with milk and sugar prepared in the Viennese way. The cake variety is endless, Sacher Tarte naturally being the most famous, but there are so many other great options that it is always hard to choose.

Austrian culture does not differ too much from our own Finnish one. The city is tidy and feels fairly safe. The public transport system works amazingly well: metros, trams and buses run often and usually on time. However, Austria is a very traditional, conservative country. People quite generally fast before Easter, and shops close usually by 6 pm. After Saturday 6 pm the grocery stores open the next time on Monday morning (a bit problematic  for a foreigner arriving in the city on Saturday evening). In addition to doing the internship I had a chance to spend a week at the FH Campus observing the local physiotherapy teaching. Practical classes and lectures were very similar to the ones at our campus at home, only the topics differed slightly, so I learned some new techniques.

All in all, I can sincerelly recommend choosing Vienna as an exchange destination! 🙂

Schloss Schönbrunn

Ragazze mie, questo è Italia!

The Spring in Udine

If I should describe the scenery of Italy with different sounds, the soundtrack would consist of chiming of church bells, birdsong, honking of cars and some Italians speaking loudly to one another. Mix this with the scent of flowers and maybe some freshly baked pizza, interaction with friendly locals plus unbelievable views, and here you go, you’re in the heart of Italy!

Beauty of Verona

We spent our three-month exchange in Northern Italy, in a small city called Udine with my classmate Noora working in the field of physiotherapy. During the exchange we did three traineeships in different departments of the rehabilitation hospital Gervasutta. First practice was in children’s policlinic, the second one was with adults in a department called Biomeccanica, where the patients had had partial spinal cord injuries. The third one was general rehabilitation department where there was patients with brain injuries.

In all the departments we got to practice physiotherapy independently, but there was also some bystanding when we observed physiotherapists to do the work. We didn’t know almost any Italian so there was some difficulties with teachers and patients who didn’t speak English. In those situations either the Italian students translated us the important things or if that wasn’t possible, we managed to translate some things by ourselves and to speak simple words and sentences to patients and teachers. Oh boy you learn a lot of Italian in three months if you must! The teachers and Italian students were really friendly and despite the language barrier you could understand and get to know each other well and have fun.

One of the palestras in the hospital of Gervasutta

The courses of physiotherapy are also held in the hospital of Gervasutta and the teachers of physiotherapy are besides teaching working in the different departments of the hospital. All the students do practical training in the morning and in the afternoon they have lectures. The schoolday can last from 8am to 6pm (there is two-hour break at noon) and there is many tests during the year so it’s a lot of work. The students seem to appreciate the education very much and they’re very motivated and hard-working. It shows in the results: The level of skill and knowledge is high. I guess is partly because in Italy you must pay for the higher education. The Gervasutta is one of the best physiotherapy schools in Northern Italy.

The rush hour in Venice

Compared to Finnish hospitals, the working culture is a bit different in Italy, at least here in Udine. There is a lot less coffee breaks (depending for the department, of course) but more communality. People greet everyone, also the strangers, and everyone are working together and helping each other if needed. People do something all the time and often many things are done at the same time. Also in some departments there is this huge working area, “palestra”, where many patients are treated at the same time, so it’s a lot of hustling and bustling and noises. In the hospital where we were, there was also a lot of paper work: in Finland about all the information of patients is on computer, here all the documents were paper versions. And that is a lot of paper and files!

Naples, what a view!

Although there are less coffee breaks and lots of things been done, there is sometimes a lot of waiting too and you’ll get used to not to know what happens next, especially if you’re not that good in Italian. All the equipment might not work as you would expect them to do and things might not always happen in the minute you have agreed. But as one of our tutors once said “Ragazze mie, questo è Italia!” (free translation: “Oh my dear girls, this is Italia!”), it’s a part of Italian culture.

The best pizza I’ve ever had!

In my spare time, I have been doing lots of traveling, taking part of events and parties with other Erasmus students and enjoying the atmosphere, food, drinks (very affordable wine and Aperol Spritz) and the culture of Italy. For example in the Easter we went to Naples for a few days and it was such an experience! The city of Naples was unbelievable: So much crazy traffic, cars honking and scooters speeding pass you in the narrow streets, so much trash and splittered glass everywhere and a bit obscure people in the dark alleys! But on the other hand so helpful and kind locals and very beautiful views of the sea and the volcano Vesuvio. And the pizza was so delicious! I ate the best pizza margherita after visiting the archeological site of Pompeii, in a nice pizzeria in the beautiful center of the village of Pompeii. Also I miss the small pizzettas you can buy for 1€ from the street booths – yum! When in Naples you could really understand the differences of northern and southern Italy. After that trip I was kind of relieved to not to get hit by a car get to do the internship in the Northern part of Italy in a safe and peaceful Udine.

One of the piazzas in Udine (It’s Aperol time!)

As I write this I have only three weeks left of my internship. The time has flown so fast! During these months I have learned much about myself and the Italian culture. I have seen unbelievable places and met so many new, friendly people. Udine is a great base to explore the Northern Italy (and also Slovenia and Croatia). I’ve really enjoyed my time here in Italy! At times there has been difficulties but as one famous American artist sings: What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. If you have the chance to spent your exchange here in Italy, don’t hesitate! Go for it, it’ll be worth it.

Magical mountain scenery in the Fusine lakes

Saluti a tutti!

Greetings from Udine, a small city in northern Italy. Udine is a not so typical Italian city because this Friuli-Venezia-Giulia region has a lot of influences for example from Slovenia and Austria. This university city is beautiful and quiet with great possibilities to travel. It takes just a couple of hours to reach the mountains or the seaside and there are some nice small towns and bigger cities near. In fact, I have spent my weekends travelling around. For example, I have visited Trieste and Grado, which have pretty sea views.

Duomo di Milano
Pompeii

Of course, I’ve also travelled to Venice which was my absolute favourite place here in Italy. Also, Milano with its stylish atmosphere and stunning sightseeing locations was great. I have seen small Italian towns and Kanin mountains. During the Easter holiday me and my classmate travelled to Napoli to see the difference between North- and South-Italy. The difference was huge. Napoli was everything you would think of when speaking of stereotypical Italians. Their way to talk and the usage of hand gestures while communicating is a very distinctive feature. They also drive scooters a lot. But it was great to see Pompeii and Vesuvio!

Venezia
Laghi di Fusine

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vesuvio
Grado

 

 

 

 

I’m doing my physiotherapy internship here with my classmate from Finland so I’m working every day at the local hospital. Hospital “Gervasutta” is specialised in rehabilitation so I have learned a lot. My friend and I have been working at three different areas of the hospital. The first practical training was with children so it was my favourite. The second training was with patients who had spinal cord injuries and with amputation patients. Now we are working at a department where people with different types of brain injuries are treated. I have seen so much during my stay here and neurological physiotherapy has become familiar. Some of the teachers/physiotherapists speak English. With the patients I must speak Italian language. When I came here I didn’t know the language but the practical training has taught me so many words and phrases. Also, working here has tested my manual and visual skills constantly. The biggest difference between Finnish and Italian way of doing physiotherapy in a hospital is that here you must wait everything because things happen so slowly. They also do loads of paperwork here which amazes me. It seems like they don’t use so much softwares to keep record of patients and treatments. Also, students must give every assignment in paper. Physiotherapy education also takes place in Gervasutta. The students have practical training at the units every morning and afternoon they have classes. I think that practical training at the hospital is a great way to improve students’ skills. For me as an exchange student it has also been a wonderful opportunity to get to know local students because I’m not at the University of Udine at all.

 

 

 

 

During my free time I like to get familiar with the city of Udine and do some sports. I have also taken part in nice events arranged by the ESN of Udine (Erasmus student network). I have spent my time with other Erasmus students and of course tasted a variety of Italian food and drinks. For example, here in Udine they serve a typical dish called frico. And tiramisù is from this region! And what would my time in Italy be without tasting plenty of pizzas, gelatos and wines.

      

Oh, how time has flown. It’s hard to believe that I have already lived here for over two months. Now I will enjoy my last month in Italy. Luckily, the weather is finally great (around +26 degrees) and the nature has blossomed. It’s like the best of Finnish summer here even though it’s only spring and some people are still using their winter jackets. See you soon Finland! Ciao!

Piazza Libertà

 

 

From Dobrich with love

Hello,

Time has passed very quickly. It is easy to see now when my exchange is coming to an end. I came to Dobrich, Bulgaria in the end of january and before may turns to june i’ll be back in Tampere, Finland. I studied for Business Administration in Varna University of Management and campus is located in Dobrich that is about 60km from Varna.

Studying style in VUM is close to one that we have in TAMK. All courses begin with few lectures and after that we started to do group projects independently. Some courses had a group assignment and a test but in most cases the group assignment was a priority and gave highest points of mark. My courses included studies of entrepreneurship and project management, organizational behaviour and marketing communications. Organizational behaviour gave me the most of them.

I made a couple of short trips away from Bulgaria during this semester but most of my time i spent in Dobrich and in Varna so i’ll tell you of these places and spice the story with couple pictures from beautiful countryside of Dolina and seaside of Baltsik.

When i came here it was the end of january and everything was a bit weird. Neighbourhood buildings were ready to be demolished and temperature was about +16 celsius. Environment was so different what i have used to. Fortunately it all changed quickly. Not that those buildings would had been repaired but temperature dropped to minus degrees so i did not bring my winter jacket for nothing. During winter Bulgaria is surprisingly snowy, during the worst parts it was snowing for three days and all our classes were cancelled for those days, what a pity.

After the snowy and wet part of year which lasted for one and a half month it turned out to be much better. For last two months it has been more than 20 degrees and mostly sunny every day with one exeption as today 8th of may it has been raining all the time. That is more than a great thing for a Finn who can’t even imagine a one week of such a pleasant temperatures.

 

 

 

 

When you decide to come to Bulgaria remember that there differences in communication, especially time is here relatively different. In Finland timetables are accurate till the end of time but in here timetables are to give guidance and assumptions. Fortunately nothing serious happened but couple of times i had to change my plans because as a tourist i lacked of a better information to local habits.

Bulgaria is cheap as a country so you don’t need lot of savings to have some good time here. Another thing from Bulgaria on top of my mind is that this place is a land of endless fields which continues to horizon. It is crazy how vast these fields are in countryside. Perfect place to travel around with awesome company.

It is easy to recommend you to visit Varna. I am sure you will have good time there as it is beautiful and close to the size of Tampere. When i missed Finland i did a trip to Varna to relieve stress. My campus was in Dobrich which is quite a quiet place to spent for a long time. There are not much of different activities so mostly i let out the steam by exercising. How ever from Varna you can find places to relax like a huge park, lots of shopping possibilities, tens of museums and historical places like Roman baths and this awesome swimming pool is right next to sea. You can swim in the sea too.

Another awesome place to visit is portrait beautiful small town called Baltsik. Pictures above are from Baltsik and there is an awesome botanical garden and great view to sea. There is also less impressive palace which is in the picture. It is more like a tourist trap but like said the botanical garden is very beautiful as is the town itself. As a bonus there was an extremely friendly street dog which companied me and my girlfriend for a long time as we walked around the town.

Talking of abandoned cats and dogs…there is plenty in Bulgaria. You can find them wandering in every town. Funny though that all of them are relaxed, minding their own business and people treat them well, many are even giving them foor more or less regularly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

During this period of about 4 months i have been living in dead town in an apartment of less than 50m2 with five people. I share a 10m2 room with another person and sometimes construction guys cut off running water from the whole town for a day. However i couldn’t be luckier as i got this awesome young French gentleman – Jeremy – to keep me company for these months. It was not always easy to stay away from Finland because girlfriend and all other friends are there but i am very happy that i made great friends here too. It made this experience unique and memorable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merci and tsao tsao!

 

 

 

 

Spring in Valencia

I am spending my exchange year in Valencia and studying music in the Conservatorio superior de música “Joaquín Rodrigo”. The curriculum here is very different from what we have back home in Finland, so I have taken the opportunity to try out all kinds of new subjects. As a singer I have been especially exited about the number of lessons we get working with a pianist every week. In addition to this, the school offers subjects like stage acting, body movement, singers’ anatomy lessons, chamber music and language studies. So, a whole package of skills essential for professional singers! My biggest challenge has been the language. All the lessons are held in Spanish, and even though my Spanish skills are improving, they don’t quite cover the professional anatomy vocabulary at this point. 😉

Now that the rainy winter months are over, the best way to spent time in Valencia is outside. Right next to my home, continuing through the whole city is the Turia-park. In the past, it used to be a river, but after causing huge floods in town it was dried from water. Today it has been transformed into a beautiful, I believe at least 9km long park-area, for all Valencians to enjoy. It is a place where people go jogging or cycling, families go for a picnic and kids have play-dates in the children’s parks. The cafes, football fields and roller-skating rinks ensure that people of all ages can find things to enjoy. So, when the sun is shining outside – and it mostly is – I love to go to Turia, do some sports, have a coffee or just sit on the grass and watch the people and life around me. 🙂

Pozdrav iz Hrvatske!

Hello from Croatia. I have been here since late of february and there is few more weeks to go. I started my practical training in March in Klinicki Bolnicki Centar Osiiek, which means the Main hospital in Osijek. Osijek is in the east side of Croatia which is called Slavonia. The first 4 weeks I was in abdominal surgery department and children surgery ward. And now I am having 6 weeks of maternity and paediatric training in the same hospital. My mentors are very nice and they are always asking me how I´m doing and is there something I want to see. The people here in general are very warm and friendly. First when I came to hospital I was very exited about everything because I could communicate with others only in english and there is huge language wall between me and others because they dont understand english. And sometimes it is difficult to communicate with patients or with other nurses but the nurses are very eager to show me everything, and patients of course are very chatty. I got to know also a lot about Croatian culture and not just nursing.

Traditional breakfast with colleagues in children's surgery ward.

There is lots of differences working in hospitals in here tahn in Finland. Nurses are graduated from highschool and they have to work in 12 hour shifts. And nurses with diploma who are graduated from university works only 8 hours per weekday. The amount of the hours is still the same like we have in Finland. The wards are much bigger than we have but there is less staff so there is much work to do. The patients stays in hospitals much longer and they also have their own pajamas and shoes with them.

There isn’t so much computers and every thing has to still write down. The patients have document on their bed where stands the vital signs, diuresis, medication and diagnosis. Everything is bit old and used, but there is also much more creativity with hospital equipments. The hospital beds lays next to each other and there is no curtains between them. So there isn’t actually any privacy between patients.

Buildings are old and in hospital area there is many separate houses next to each other, so the hospital is actually multiple buildings sharing the same garden. And you can see that this part of Croatia didn´t survive trough the Yugoslavian war so easily. There is lot to repair. But still the city is amazing.

For slavonian people it’s very common to go after work  to cafes near the river Drava. Which is joining the larger river Tonau only 15 km after Osijek. In the city you can see multiple cafe’s and also many tiny bakeries from where you can buy snack or lunch to go.  in daytime there is many people in city and talking each other. In Osijek there is also the Old town which is must see. There is one nice slavonian restaurant which serves delicious slavonian dishes, pork  and paprika in many ways.

There is long promenade both side of the River Drava and there is beautiful pedestrian bridge over it near the city center. Osijek is the bicycle friendliest city in Croatia and I know it is easy to cycle around here. The city is not too big and there is also nice places to visit. There’s the Zoo, outdoor pools (which is opened unfortunately after I return from here), basketball and football matches, the old town, and multiple parks. Osijek is also the greenest city in Croatia because in here is multiple beautiful parks where you can have picnic or just hang around.

 

I feel so proud to survive in here because this was the first time I ever went to abroad alone and after this I know I have so much friends from other countries. I can’t wait when I get back to Finland and see my family again.

Yours Alli

The Most Friendliest Coutry

Hello from Ireland town call Tralee! I’m almost over my 3 month internship here in University Hospital Kerry. First I was so nervous how I’m going to survive here and I wasn’t so confident of my English because I have never been alone abroad. Even before I came here I got so much support from Institute of Technology Tralee so I was sure that everything going to go just fine. When I got  here I had to come 2 weeks earlier so I have the time to finish my Garda Vetting before I can go to work at the hospital. Everybody was so kind and supportive so all that paper work went flying. Meanwhile when I waited the results we went to Dublin with my boyfriend who came with me to stay for the first week. Even we were there only couple nights we saw Guinness factory and Natural History Museum. We also saw some lovely church and parks.

 

After that it was time to say  goodbye to my boyfriend and head back to Tralee.  When my first day started at the hospital I was nervous about how I’m going to cope. After a while I started to get some confident and my speech was getting better. Irish people speak very fast so that can take a while to learn but after first two weeks I was coping just fine. I also notice that most of the words that they used in health care was familiar from latin. Even the learning was more of listening than doing I still saw and learn so much. Even the shifts could sometimes be 12 hours they wasn’t still too bad. After all you get Friday off so more time to explore Ireland! The hospital staff was so kind and ready answer any of my questions. We got along so well and I was feeling so welcomed. Hospital full of gold.

We also got some snow in here and everybody was panicking about that because they don’t usually get snow in here. Luckily in Tralee we didn’t get as much snow as in Dublin but I still got to make a snow(wo)man under my window.

Even here is raining a lot it didn’t stop me to go out and see the beautiful  Irish nature every weekend. Because I love taking photos I have now over 2500 pictures taken but I’m still feel that it is not enough. I think the best place where I got my best pictures were Killarney and Dingle. These were places were I visited more than once because there was so much to see and so lovely scenery. In Killarney there is a National park where you can find lovely walking paths and breath taking views. You can also get cabriole ride around the park but I prefer walking. I visited Ross Castle and Muckross house which was lovely places to see. I saw also all kinds of animals and birds.

In Dingle I ate best seafood plate ever! And I climb to see the big sea.

 

Also I took a part of Tralee park run which take place every Saturday. It was so fun event and I haven’t run as much and when the nurses were telling about this at first I wasn’t so keen to go there. But luckily I went  because it was the best! Even I didn’t know the people everybody was cheering for everybody and they didn’t care did you walk or run as long as you had fun.  In Tralee I went to walk every change I could get and near to my apartment is a nice forest where was calm and lovely to walk.

My apartment is a Kings Court  (http://kingscourtapartments.com/). It is nice shared flat we have our own rooms and bathroom is en suite. We all share a kitchen/living room. Right next to us we have Tesco where you can buy everything that you need and not so far is a pit cheaper Aldi. One of the problems every time I had to wash my laundry was that the machine takes only 1€ coins so I have to hoard every 1€ coin that I can get! My roommates are two men and one woman. Mens are studying health  care also and they were really nice to me. Girl was in Spain so we had so much in common to figure out things. We went together to Killarney to celebrate St. Patricks day and we had so much fun. And you can’t forget the pubs what they have here! With a good beer there was often a live music.

 

I have seen a lot but there is still so much to see and I have less than 3 weeks left. I have plan to see northern coast  with my boyfriend  when he comes here for the final week. I have learn so much in this trip about my internship and myself also. I have said that it is not so crazy idea anymore to think that maybe some day I could live and work abroad. I would not change this time for anything.

See you soon!