All posts by Heljä Kallio

Greetings from sunny and beautiful Porto!

My practical training

During my 2,5 months of practise in Porto, I have two practises: pediatrics and obstretics. Both practises took place in the biggest hospital of Porto, St. John Hospital  Hospital São João, which took me a few weeks to learn how to pronounce and still Portuguese people smile when I say it :D. Portuguese language has a lot of nouns that don’t exist in the languages that I speak, so it has been very difficult to even pronunciate some words.
The pediatric practise took place in a day hospital, where I prepared a lot of medication and learned about many chronical disaeases. The picture is from the pediatric practise where luckily me and my friend where on the same place! 🙂 The obstretic pra the babies have a black, thick hair! 😀

Freetime

The spare time in Porto has been really nice, the city is extremely beautiful and comfy at the same time. I’ve met a lot of nice people and made new friends who I like to spend my free time with. Here it is very natural to meet up by having dinner, and it’s quite cheap to eat out compared to Finland. I’m living with my friend and in our flat there is no wifi, so instead of netflix, we’ve been doing a puzzle of one thousand pieces.:D I warmly recommend it.
I’ve also done a bit of travelling in Portugal and after my practise I’m going to travel around Portugal and Spain before coming back to Finland.

 

 

 

 

Views of Porto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A a good daytrip to Guimaraes with some other exchange students, who I spend time with weekly.

 

 

 

Studies and practise compared to Finland

Even though I’m doing a practise in the hospital, I also have classes at school and I’ve got to know to Portuguese students. Their mentality to studying is a bit different, and grades are more important. They also get grades from their practises on a scale of 0-20, whereas in Finland the practise is either accepted or not. It seems that the students put a lot more work into their presentations and are well prepared. I think their skills of argumenting are more advanced since they have to give a proper feedback about others presentations.

In the hospital the things work pretty much in the same way as in Finland. Nurses come to work, do the work and go home.There are some differences though: or me it was confusing to realise that the medication is not behind locked doors like it’s in Finland.

The nurses are usually not very friendly to students and to the Erasmus students they don’t like to look in the eye too much. 😀 Most don’t speak English and some of them just don’t want to. The teachers don’t speak English either, so the other students are translating if needed. It is quite challenging to work without being able to talk in Portuguese, but there are also very funny situations that come from using the few Portuguese words I know + ”the sign language”.

The nurses have been striking a lot this year and are demanding better working conditions. They don’t get paid extra of evenings, nights, weekends, holidays or the years of experience. Even though there are a lot improve for nurses in Finland, this is giving a bit of perspective of how well things are for nurses in Finland..

All in all, I’ve loved being in Portugal, it is an interesting culture and I wouldn’t mind staying longer. On the other hand, I’m happy to go home where I have a warm shower and in every small talk situation I don’t have to say: ”Yes, I’m from Finland, it’s very cold and dark in there and we’re all very very blond.”

 

Porto locates to the coast of Atlantic and the sunsets are simply outstanding.

 

 

-Heljä