Category Archives: Social Sciences, Business and Administration

Business Administration, Business Information Systems, Entrepreneurship and Team Leadership, Business Competence, Legal Expertise, Service Business and Project Management, Entrepreneurship, Wellbeing Technology, Information System Competence, International Selling and Sales Management

Γειά σας! – Greetings from Greece!

I am doing my internship in Rhodes Island, Greece. Rhodes is such a beautiful island and I have fallen in love with it. There are so many historical places to see here and truly amazing beaches. Now in the middle of summer the weather is unbelievably hot. Almost +40 degrees in the shadow during the day. And everyone says it will be even hotter in August! It has been quite difficult for me to get used to this kind of weather but I am doing it somehow. Luckily, we have air conditioners in our office and our apartment, because without it, the weather would be unbearable.

I have enjoyed working here even though it hasn’t been quite what I expected. Although, I have already learned so much and will learn even more before this internship is complete. At first my work was mostly picking up students from the airport and taking them to their hotels where they started working. It really didn’t seem like my work had anything to do with marketing or human resources (that’s what I was supposed to be doing). However, I soon started to other things while I was taking the students to their hotels. For example, I met with the hotel managers and talked to them about co-operation with our company. I also created all the necessary documents for the students and went to different Government offices to get them approved. Now I find the work really interesting and versatile which is very good because I am learning something every day and now my work is actually related to my studies.

I have had a lot of spare time here. I thought I was going to work 6 days per week here but it turned out that I only work for five days per week. So, every week I have two whole days to visit different places. Mostly in my spare time I go to the nearest beach and just relax. Sometimes I visit other places like the city of Rhodes, Lindos or the other islands nearby. I live in such a small village and there really isn’t much to do here. Luckily, it’s easy to go around the island by bus or boats. I have been in some cruises here too and I truly enjoy them. But during this month I haven’t visited many places because it’s so hot here that even the idea of walking around the cities makes me sweat. So basically, I just spend my days off at the beach. Luckily, the water is still quite cold so it’s perfect for swimming and cooling down on a hot day.

It was a little bit of a shock for me when I started working here. I noticed that companies are not so organized here and they have serious communication issues. First it seemed like no one knew who was really in charge and people gave different orders and tasks for me. Some days in the office were really quiet and I had only a few tasks but then there were days when they gave me too many tasks to do and it was in no way possible for me to do all of them on time.

Also, Greeks have a really bad temper, it took time for me to get used to the fact that if things didn’t go how they wanted, they got angry and started yelling at each other. Here it’s normal to show emotions and express them however you like but in Finland people are shy and mostly keep their feelings to themselves. That’s why it was quite shocking at first that people are so open and emotional here but I have gotten used to it by now and started to be more open myself.

Business in Japan

Japan is a country very different from Denmark and Finland.
I have been here in Tokyo for 2.5 months so far and it has been a crazy experience!
Currently I am doing my internship as a sales intern at a start up coming called
Beyond Borders, which is a company that deals in real estate and it has been
the busiest time of my life. The company growing fast and we recently moved
to a new office so.. YAY!

Anyway.. As a sales intern, I am not really an intern but actually function as a full-time employee. I work as long hours as the full-timers, I have the same responsibilities and I am in charge of managing a huge amount of customers.
So how long is a general working day for me? Well, first of all I get up 7.30 in the morning and make it to work by 9AM (There is a 30 minute walk to the office, so need to get up well in time for breakfast), I then work until 1 o’clock and have around 1 hour for my lunchbreak and finally I end work at 6PM.

With that said, there is a lot of Zangyo and my longest day has been a whopping 12 hours!
Of course, in Japan there is also time for fun and that’s where nomkai comes into play.

Nomikai is a sort of drinking party together with your boss and co-workers and it is an
incredibly good time for bonding and just overall having fun and relaxing a bit more than
the somewhat tense atmoshphere that can sometimes be at a serious day at the office!

When I have a day off and actually have time to do something other than work and visa related things, I tend to spend it on exploring Tokyo. So far I have walked aroudn most of Shibuya and Shinjuku and have also been to various other areas due to the nature of my job.

Japan is an amazingly beautiful country with many shrines and a great view at night (Sorry I don’t have any night life photos of the city), but I promise it’s great!

Finally, as I worked in Finland last year I guess I have some experience to compare the two working cultures.
As I’ve already mentioned working in Japan is a lot tougher due to the many extra hours of work, possible overtime (which often is the case in this business) and  a stronger social hierachy.

While this company is a start-up, they are not exactly your traditional Japanese company, but still has some traits of traditional Japanese working life.

Overall, I have loved this experience so far and I definitely recommend trying out something similar if you are really looking to get hands on experiene!

Goede middag uit Amsterdam!

Amsterdam is a city of canals, french fries and friendly people. It is the capital of the Netherlands and has a population over 800 000 people. Amsterdam’s demographic is different compared to the rest of the Netherlands because it has a population almost 50% Dutch and 50% foreigners. That’s why it’s common to use English in everyday actions and most of the people speak English fluently.

 

I have done my exchange period in this lovely city, in school named Hogeschool van Amsterdam. It translates to Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. My courses mostly consisted of finance and economics, which was first a bit difficult due to lack of finance courses in TAMK. Lecturers were great and professional, but they also expected lots of general knowledge about finance even at first. The lectures were interactive and lecturers made sure everybody was paying attention to the subject.

  

Compared to Finland, there were fewer lectures and most of the studying took place at home. Also, the courses took the whole semester and exams were all in June. The Dutch grading system is completely different than in Finland. They have a scale from 1 to 10, where 1-5,5 indicates fail, 6 satisfactory, 7 more than satisfactory, 8 good, 9 very good and 10 outstanding. Grades 9 and 10 are given very rarely. In my opinion, the level of education is higher than in Finland and it’s also more challenging, but still manageable.

  

Amsterdam is filled with adorable restaurants, bars, and parks, where you can eat and drink affordably. Of course, you can always bike to these places. As a beer person, I visited some of the Dutch breweries. My favorite place was this place called Brouwerij’t IJ, which was a brewery inside the windmill. For the food, I would always go to this neighborhood called De Pijp, where most of the people are Dutch – not tourists. For the culture, I visited Rijksmuseum, Van Gogh museum and Anne Frank house. Even though these places are really crowded with tourists, they are excellent places to get more knowledge about the Dutch history and see beautiful paintings. There was a common room in our accommodation, where you could play cards, party or just hang with the other exchange students. This was great because I didn’t live in the central.

Overall I can recommend Amsterdam to everyone for studying, working or just visiting. I had myself an amazing time in this city and I hope we’ll see again!

¡Hola! Saludos desde Madrid!

I have now spent the last 10 months in Madrid. First, I was doing my Erasmus studies here at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos for one semester. After that I started my internship with a company called Citylife Madrid. At the moment, my 5 months internship is going to end. On this post, I will focus on my experiences during my Erasmus study exchange abroad.

One semester in Universidad Rey Juan Carlos lasts for about 4-5 months, depending on which courses you select. All my courses lasted from September to December, so I didn’t have school anymore in January. The University was located a little bit outside of the centre of Madrid, so I always went there by metro which took about 30-40 minutes each way. The campus area was nice; couple of palm trees on the outside and benches to sit down during breaks. Also, the big library was a good place to study for the finals and to do group projects. About the courses that I selected: compared to my studies in Finland, I think the teaching quality wasn’t as good and furthermore, there weren’t so many interesting courses to choose from. Not only is this my opinion, but I have also heard the same from other Finnish exchange students as well. I studied all my courses in English but there was also a chance to study in Spanish or with both of the languages.

And then something about Madrid itself… I’m not wondering at all why it is the capital of Spain. Madrid is a really beautiful city that is full of life day by night. Its architecture is just gorgeous. The city is divided in many different neighbourhoods of which Malasaña and La Latina are definitely my favourite ones. Not to mention the Parque de El Retiro that is a huge park in a city centre. I used to go there to run in the evenings and sometimes have picnics with friends during the day.

In Madrid, there are parties going on every day of the week and you can’t find a bar that doesn’t have Sangria or Tinto de Verano in their selection. People like to sit down outside on the terraces to see their family and friends while eating some tapas.

In Spain they have many different holidays during the year. That means, no school or work and also some shops might be closed (depending on which holiday is it). That gave me and my friends good reasons to travel all around Spain. We visited many cities, for example in Valencia and Sevilla. Those cities were so pretty too!

If you ever wondered about doing a study exchange in Madrid or to just go there for vacation, I can highly recommend it! The culture and the city itself is way different than what we have in Finland and it gives you amazing experiences and memories to remember for the rest of your life! <3

Living in the UK

I have spent my spring as an exchange student in Univeristy of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom. I participated in three courses and those we had to choose from five possible course options. I was not that pleased in the end of the course options since if I were to have gone to Portsmouth in the fall period, I would have had over 20 course options. I found that the courses I chose had similarities to the courses I have had at TAMK even though the courses description didn’t sound similar to TAMK’s courses. Despite the similarities I can say that I learned new information that I can use in working life in the future. The biggest learning points has been adapting into diverse groups and studying how other students from all over the world study and what kind is their education culture.

During the exchange I had school weekly from Monday to Wednesday – so I had a lot of time to travel around the UK and Europe. The courses that I participated into had quite a lot of reports etc. to write so I couldn’t travel every single weekend – but almost every second weekend I spent in Brighton, London or somewhere in Europe. The train ride from Portsmouth to London took less than 2 hours so as London being my favorite city in the world – I travelled there quite often. Brighton is only 1 hour way from Portsmouth and I really loved that city too. We had a 1 month easter break in April where I interrailed for 2 and a half weeks. The interrail trip started from London, then a bullet train to Paris, then a flight to Nice (French railway system was on a strike), then a 40 min train to Monte Carlo, then an overnight train to Rome (and of course I also visited the Vatican City), then a train to Venice, then Bern in Switzerland and then a 12 hour train to the last destination in Amsterdam from where I flew to Finland for the last part of my easter break before returning to Portsmouth. The ultimate best part of the interrail trip was that when I went to the Vatican City and the Pope was there to greet people and I saw him from just a few meters distance.

As for the differences in the ways of teaching and studying at TAMK versus University of Portsmouth i didn’t find that many. The Portsmouth courses were a bit more theoretical but on the other hand I feel like that the course tasks and exams at TAMK have been more difficult than the ones I had at University of Portsmouth. Also the fact that they had over a month of easter break in the middle of the semester was quite strange to me.

  • Reetta Pienimäki

Grüsse aus Germany!

Greetings from Germany!

I have been in Essen now almost five months. Four days left and I’ll be back home, finally. I have done my practical training here in Essen and it has been amazing. I have learnt a lot about working life for an example about team work. I have also learnt so much about myself and I’m very proud of myself that I had the courage to come here.

I work in a Finnish company and all my co-workers are Finnish as well so I haven’t really learn anything about German working culture. So I can’t really compare those. I am working as a management assistant and this job has been very nice, fun and challenging but also quite hard and stressful sometimes. In our office there is three interns, all from Finland, and we have become friends. This training period would have been quite bad without them!

^ me and my dear co-workers

On my spare time (during the week) I usually cook, watch Netflix, read or just chill. After work I’m so tired that I really don’t want to do anything special. On Saturdays we (me and my co-workers) are having an adventure day. We have travelled to different cities like Köln, Dortmund, Venlo and Roermond (in Holland), Mönchengladbach and so on. We have visited in a zoo, museums and spent hours in Primark. I have also been in football games! Saturday is the best day of the week. On Sundays I also just chill because everything (shops and supermarkets) are closed. On Sundays we have visited museums and went to restaurants.

^1) FC Köln vs Bayer Leverkusen, amazing atmosphere! 2) Ready for the game in Düsseldorf.

^1) Duisburg Zoo 2) views from Düsseldorf tv-tower

Like I said I can’t really compare Finnish and German working life but I have note some differences in everyday life:

  1. Everyone uses cash!! This was quite hard to understand first because I’m so used to pay with card. It was surprising that even in big cities like Düsseldorf some restaurants took only cash.
  2. Alcohol is super cheap and it’s okay to have a bear at 10 am. When I went to a restaurant/bar on Saturday to have a nonalcoholic drink the waiter looked me like “why don’t you drink alcohol?” 😀
  3. Almost in every house there is a bathtub instead of regular shower. At least all the houses that I have been.
  4. I still don’t understand how I should recycle. You should put everything recyclable in one bin and all rest in another except paper/cardboard. But when I take a look in yellow and in grey dumpster they look exactly the same.
  5. Normal pillow size is about 80×80 cm which is enormous!! I can’t sleep with those.
  6. In supermarket you have to be very fast in checkout because the checkout line (kassahihna) is so short. If you are too slow you get angry looks. It is easiest to put everything back in the shopping cart, go to those side tables (which are meant to packing) and pack your things.
  7. There is no pick and mix candy.
  8. All the movies and tv-series are dubbed which is annoying sometimes. Like I could have watch Simpsons but I didn’t understand what they were saying in German. We went to movies once (also dubbed) and it was nice feeling when you understand what was happening!

+1. Many times locals have asked us what language we are talking. People are very interested to know why we are in Germany and everybody seem to like Finland.

^The most beautiful place EVER! Köln Dom.

All in all I haven’t really noticed many differences. But maybe I’m so “used to” live here already that I don’t noticed those. And I’m always with Finnish people so I haven’t really noticed any local habits. My roommate is German (she is amazing too) but I haven’t noticed any big cultural differences at home either. I have to say that the public transport works very well!

^Food is life, best burgers in Düsseldorf (@bob and mary)

All in all this trip has been amazing and I will never forget this spring. Still I’m more than ready to go home. I haven’t see my family in five months and I can’t wait to spend a summer in Finland!

Paris When It Sizzles

It has now been four and half months since I arrived in Paris for the first time ever. Since then, I have nearly finished my studies, travelled around France, eaten a lot of baguette and of course made new friends.

During these four months I have studied management in ESCE International Business School. I am one of the whopping seven Finnish exchange students in our school. In total there’s almost 100 of exchange students and we come from all over the world. I have had eight courses, varying from two to eight credits. My courses mix bachelor- and master-level studies. 

My schedule hasn’t been tight, but the work load has sometimes been a lot. Despite of that, I have been thrilled to participate in courses that my home university doesn’t offer. Just like in TAMK, most of the studies included a group work project and that enabled me to get to know people from other cultures.

Throughout this semester, my weekends have been somewhat scheduled. Surprise surprise, friends and family wanted to visit Paris (and me) often and I have acted as their tourist guide. In Paris it’s also super easy to hop in a bus to Belgium, Netherlands, UK, Germany, Monaco… You name it. Opens a whole new world of travelling for a Finn.

Here are some things that were new and/or surprising to me:

  • People always jaywalk. If they don’t, they are tourists.
  • Don’t you dare to buy bread from your closest supermarket. It’s boulangerie or nothing. And you wouldn’t want it any other way.
  • Lunch takes 1-2 hours and contains two courses. It is not just about refuelling for the end of the day. It is about enjoying the food and the company.
  • Big percentage of the restaurants close their doors between lunch and dinner, 14-19 o’clock. The restaurants that have their kitchens open and working, are marked with the text ‘service continu’.
  • French people actually know english and aren’t afraid to use it. And also, I haven’t crossed my path with a Frenchman or -woman that would have been notably rude.
  • C’est la grève! As in, these guys like to make political standouts – such as a strike of public transports, that lasts for months.
  • Having an oven is a luxury. Same goes for elevators and central heating.
  • French people are most likely lately and not a single bit sorry about it.

This has been my first time ever in France, but much to my own delight, I adapted to the culture fairly quick. Maybe it’s the C’est la vie -attitude that got to me. Not worrying and stressing about things that I can’t change.

As a destination for exchange studies, I would recommend Paris for a nature that is easy-going and organized. For instance, you may receive information fairly late, but be sure it will arrive. Having a laid-back attitude helped me enjoy my time in France more.

Bisous,

Heidi

  ¨

From Dobrich with love

Hello,

Time has passed very quickly. It is easy to see now when my exchange is coming to an end. I came to Dobrich, Bulgaria in the end of january and before may turns to june i’ll be back in Tampere, Finland. I studied for Business Administration in Varna University of Management and campus is located in Dobrich that is about 60km from Varna.

Studying style in VUM is close to one that we have in TAMK. All courses begin with few lectures and after that we started to do group projects independently. Some courses had a group assignment and a test but in most cases the group assignment was a priority and gave highest points of mark. My courses included studies of entrepreneurship and project management, organizational behaviour and marketing communications. Organizational behaviour gave me the most of them.

I made a couple of short trips away from Bulgaria during this semester but most of my time i spent in Dobrich and in Varna so i’ll tell you of these places and spice the story with couple pictures from beautiful countryside of Dolina and seaside of Baltsik.

When i came here it was the end of january and everything was a bit weird. Neighbourhood buildings were ready to be demolished and temperature was about +16 celsius. Environment was so different what i have used to. Fortunately it all changed quickly. Not that those buildings would had been repaired but temperature dropped to minus degrees so i did not bring my winter jacket for nothing. During winter Bulgaria is surprisingly snowy, during the worst parts it was snowing for three days and all our classes were cancelled for those days, what a pity.

After the snowy and wet part of year which lasted for one and a half month it turned out to be much better. For last two months it has been more than 20 degrees and mostly sunny every day with one exeption as today 8th of may it has been raining all the time. That is more than a great thing for a Finn who can’t even imagine a one week of such a pleasant temperatures.

 

 

 

 

When you decide to come to Bulgaria remember that there differences in communication, especially time is here relatively different. In Finland timetables are accurate till the end of time but in here timetables are to give guidance and assumptions. Fortunately nothing serious happened but couple of times i had to change my plans because as a tourist i lacked of a better information to local habits.

Bulgaria is cheap as a country so you don’t need lot of savings to have some good time here. Another thing from Bulgaria on top of my mind is that this place is a land of endless fields which continues to horizon. It is crazy how vast these fields are in countryside. Perfect place to travel around with awesome company.

It is easy to recommend you to visit Varna. I am sure you will have good time there as it is beautiful and close to the size of Tampere. When i missed Finland i did a trip to Varna to relieve stress. My campus was in Dobrich which is quite a quiet place to spent for a long time. There are not much of different activities so mostly i let out the steam by exercising. How ever from Varna you can find places to relax like a huge park, lots of shopping possibilities, tens of museums and historical places like Roman baths and this awesome swimming pool is right next to sea. You can swim in the sea too.

Another awesome place to visit is portrait beautiful small town called Baltsik. Pictures above are from Baltsik and there is an awesome botanical garden and great view to sea. There is also less impressive palace which is in the picture. It is more like a tourist trap but like said the botanical garden is very beautiful as is the town itself. As a bonus there was an extremely friendly street dog which companied me and my girlfriend for a long time as we walked around the town.

Talking of abandoned cats and dogs…there is plenty in Bulgaria. You can find them wandering in every town. Funny though that all of them are relaxed, minding their own business and people treat them well, many are even giving them foor more or less regularly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

During this period of about 4 months i have been living in dead town in an apartment of less than 50m2 with five people. I share a 10m2 room with another person and sometimes construction guys cut off running water from the whole town for a day. However i couldn’t be luckier as i got this awesome young French gentleman – Jeremy – to keep me company for these months. It was not always easy to stay away from Finland because girlfriend and all other friends are there but i am very happy that i made great friends here too. It made this experience unique and memorable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merci and tsao tsao!

 

 

 

 

Grüß Gott aus Österreich

Grüß Gott aus Österreich

I spent my 4 months of exchange in a small but lovely city; Wiener Neustadt. Wiener Neustadt is located about 60km south of the capital Vienna.

I studied in Fachhochschule Wiener Neustadt (University of Applied Sciences). It is located on the outskirts of the city center. The dorms where I lived at were really close to the school and it took around 5-7minutes to walk to and from the school to the dorms.

The University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt was founded as the first of its kind in 1994 and counts among the top educational institutions in the state. More than 3600 students are enrolled in a Bachelor or Master programme at one of the campuses: Wiener Neustadt, Wieselburg, Tulln and Vienna.

FHWN provides extensive and future-oriented educational and research programmes and at present, they offer 34 Bachelor and Master programmes in five faculties: Business, Engineering, Health Sciences, Security, and Sport. More than 300 employees and 1300 lecturers provide for a modern and efficient practice-oriented education.

Studying at FHWN was a great experience. I would say that the quality of the education is about the same as in Finland. The teachers were really professional and I enjoyed their classes. The facilities were in good shape and there was a brand new building as well. Classrooms had everything we needed and the IT side also worked perfectly.

I had all of my classes in Wiener Neustadt but I got to visit the facility in Wieselburg and it was brand new.

All of my courses happened to be on Mondays and Tuesdays so I had a lot of free time.

 

At the dorms we became one big family with the other exchange students and we had a lot of activities together at the dorms and also managed to plan many memorable trips together to Budapest, Prague and other beautiful cities abroad and also in Austria.

Budapest

I will visit Austria again soon!

-Kenneth Lundström

You alright, mate?

Hiya!

I spent three months in the surprisingly warm and sunny Portsmouth in the south coast of England. Who knew there are palm trees in the English seaside? Portsmouth is a coastal city, slightly smaller than Tampere, and the main part of the city is actually located on an island, although I only realised this about halfway through my stay there. People always say that the English weather is horrible but I was actually surprised by how warm it was. Even though Portsmouth is on the south coast, I didn’t expect to have 14 degree temperatures in November. Maybe the weather is horrible in everyone else’s mind, but for a Finn it actually feels very nice?

I study International Business and I specialise in marketing. Unfortunately, there weren’t many marketing courses, or units, as the English call them, on offer at Portsmouth. Since most of the units last a full year there were only a few options for those spending only half a year. Most of the units offered to exchange students are actually shortened versions of the whole year units, so almost all of the other students are exchange students as well, which was nice in a way, because at the beginning of the year everyone was in the same situation. Still, it would have been nice to get to know some of the local students as well. Despite that, I enjoyed most of my studies, and found them in someway relevant or interesting. I also enjoyed working with the other exchange students, and since everyone was foreign, the classes were quite diverse.

In England, or at least in Portsmouth, there are only a few classes every week. I had 5 units, and most of them only had two hours of class every week. One hour lecture for everyone in the unit, and then one hour seminar in smaller groups. I found this to be a quite good way of learning, although it meant that my timetable was quite scattered. Attendance was mandatory for all classes, although no one checked for attendance in the lectures. In the seminars, however, if you miss 3 consecutive lessons, you’d essentially fail the class.

In my free time, I’d hang out in the city. There are three main “city” areas to Portsmouth. There’s Commercial Street, which is right by the University and is the actual city centre, with all the shops and things like that. Then there’s Gunwharf Quays, which is a more fancy, touristy, high end shopping and restaurant area, right by the sea and the harbor. The third one, which I liked best, is Southsea, which is where all the good bars and restaurants are. It’s on the southern side of the city, although almost everything in is within walking distance. Southsea is, in my opinion, the most beautiful area of Portsmouth, and it is the area of Portsmouth that looks the most like a stereotypical English coast city.

Southsea might be my favorite area in the city, but what I really loved doing in Portsmouth, was walking on the seaside. Being a Finn, I’m used to there being water around me all the time, and I’m not going to lie, the sea was a big reason for me when choosing Portsmouth as my exchange destination.

Since Portsmouth isn’t a very big city, I also visited the bigger cities around it, like Brighton, Southampton, and Bornmouth, as well as the absolutely beautiful Isle of Wight. Portsmouth is also only a 90 minute train drive away from London, when the trains are running that is, so I visited London quite a few times. On the last week of my stay, my boyfriend and I flew to Scotland, which was absolutely amazing and quite possibly my favorite part of my stay. We rented a car and drove around the Scottish highlands for a day, and I’m not lying when I say I’ve never seen anything so beautiful. Coming back to Portsmouth was almost a disappointment, since it was so close to Christmas and there was no snow in England, unlike in Scotland.

Compared to Finland, studying in England was quite different. There were fewer classes every week, but that meant you were expected to do more reading at home. Based on some of the teachers’ comments, I was slightly intimidated of the workload, but after receiving my grades, I can happily say that I managed just as well as at TAMK, with pretty much the same amount of work.

The grading of the units was based on an essay, a presentation, or an exam. The exchange students, however, didn’t have any exams, since those take place in January, and the autumn semester ended on the 15th of December. Most of my units were graded based on an essay, which I had never written in TAMK, only reports, so I found this quite challenging, and had to spend a lot of time in the library. This was another difference to TAMK. Students actually hang out in the library a lot, and the library is open 24/7. I liked it though. When doing groupworks, or writing essays, the library was a good place to gather in, since most of the exchange students lived in student housing, so there wasn’t enough room in anyone’s apartment to hang out it. All in all, student life is much more inclusive compared to Finland. There are different clubs for students, for different sports, different ethnicities, different diets, different political orientations etc. There’s even a Quidditch club, which is quite possibly the awesomest and most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard of. Every week is a student night in the city, with different events in different venues. Basically, if you’re a student, your whole life revolves around the university.

Portsmouth to me was quite an ideal destination. I love the city, I had great flatmates and I met amazing people from all around the world. I love the seaside, and the short distance to London. I don’t just miss the people I met there, I also miss the city itself and I’m very happy I chose to go there. It’s one of my favorite places in the world, like a home away from home, and I’m definitely going back there.