Monthly Archives: November 2019

Greetings from Sapporo

This year I had an internship in the city of Sapporo, Japan in Hokkaido University’s department of engineering. There I mainly did laboratory works with my pair and reported on the findings we did. I didn’t participate in any lectures, but I did participate on weekly meetings with our professor to update our situation and seminars in which each week somebody announced their progress to the members of the laboratory.

The main thing what I actually did was studying the materials related to the next laboratory work and then making a lot of experiments. Then after that was handling the data in excel and reporting it to the professor.

Arrival to Japan happened in late spring just in time for the late cherry blossoms of northern Japan. It was an historical time to be in the country since I was there just when the emperor retired, and a new era, Reiwa, began. To celebrate there was a festival in the local park, where I went. It was timed to group of national holidays called golden week, which was extended this year.

In my spare time I visited neighbouring and went to eat local food towns with some new friends from my laboratory. One such trip was to the town of Otaru with a bicycle. It was an interesting trip and, on our way back I definitely noticed I need more exercise. The place is famous for its seafood, historically remarkable city centre and beautiful landscapes.

 

We also visited the town of Furano in central Hokkaido to see the lavender fields they have there, also there was a place where everyone could try their hands at pottery. I went also to couple of mountains around Sapporo. Mount Moiwa is said to have one of top five, night landscapes in Japan.

One great thing about Hokkaido University is that the University has clubs that arrange meetings and different events where locals and international students can meet. There were barbeques, cooking sessions, one museum tour and many other things. There are also all kinds of event for the whole school. There was a sports day, and a festival, where the main street of the campus was filled with different stands and all kinds of events like mini concerts and dance competitions. This and my other activities made it so that it doesn’t get boring!

Studying there was different at least for me. I wasn’t a normal student so I can’t compare the lectures given there to the Finnish ones. But for the working culture around the laboratory and maybe little in general is something I can compare.

It was very common to work late. The seminars where I did attend started generally at 5 pm. Sometimes there were still people in the student room of our laboratory working at 9 or 10 pm. It was not a rarity to go out eating after the day. I discussed about the working culture in Japan and apparently it is common in the working world that you go out to drink most days with your boss and co-workers after work. This way you can bond with them, but you miss a lot of time in home compared to Finland.

People are also much more company loyal and don’t really change their workplace that often. But companies also take good care of their employees. This is what I heard at least. However, my work in the laboratory was very independent. I needed decide by myself when and how to do the tasks that were given. In Finland we have some courses that are relatively independent but nowhere close to that level.

Greetings from Kuala Lumpur

Time has just flied past really quickly here in Kuala Lumpur. We only have a few weeks of classes left, and after that we will have our exams. Even though this autumn has been pretty amazing, I’m actually looking forward on getting back home to Finland.Taylor’s University

The school system here is quite different than in Finland. In TAMK you will get a lot of credits from one course, but here the courses are divided to smaller units which means more exams. The local students are younger than in Finland, and you can see this for example in their behaviour, but also in the responsibility for their studies. It feels like the students are not responsible for their learning and the teachers and parents are the ones who are in charge of everything. For me this has been a challenge, because I’m used to being independent and being the only one who has the responsibility for my studies.

In Finland it feels easy to reach a teacher. They seem to be on the same “level” as you, but here In Taylor’s University you can really feel the ascendancy between students and teachers. You never call the teachers by their first name. Using Mrs. or Mr. when talking to them is almost always mandatory. It has not been once, twice or even three times during this semester when the teacher never showed up for the class, and without any notice for the students. The local students are used to this, but for me it felt kind of rude. If the teacher don’t show up in 30 minutes, the students usually give up and leave the class.

On the first orientation day we had a health check and we weren’t informed about it at all. They took blood samples, x-rays etc. but no one knew why and what they are would do with all the information of us. In total the health check with all the waiting took more than nine hours. This tells something about Malaysians way of handle things: nothing is done the easiest way. For example, I wanted to drop out from a course, and in total the process took over a month. I had to fill up several papers, run around the school and get signatures and also get an official confirmation from TAMK.

Luckily, we have a lot of free time, so we don’t have to be annoyed at school more than a few hours a week. We had to submit our passports on the first week because of the visa process, and during the five first weeks we only travelled within Malaysia: we saw the cool art street city Penang, “Asia’s little Venice” Melaka, Langkawi island and the paradise island Perhentian.The Perhentian Islands

Our campus is located around 15km from the city center, and since we are living on the campus there are not much to do on the free time. Some people spend time at a huge mall which is located close to the university and there they might do groceries or have dinner. You can’t walk ANYWHERE since there are no sideways (expect from our apartment to uni) and you have to take a Grab (Asia’s Uber.) Luckily, it’s really cheap, but sometimes this campus area feels like a prison because you just can’t walk anywhere. Of course, sometimes we take a Grab to the city center, and there you can spend a lot of time. Walking around the countless skyscrapers and trying different dishes from all over the world is really nice.

When we finally got our passports back, all the travelling started. The first destination was a weekend trip to Krabi in Thailand. After that I was travelling for almost three weeks nonstop. We didn’t really have any weeks of from school, but we made a “Leave of Absence” application for one week. There were also several public holidays which made this possible. We went to Cambodia, Malaysian Borneo, Brunei and Bali. I hope I will have time to spend a weekend in Singapore before we have to submit our passports to school again.

As said, this time in Asia has been great and I’m really happy I’ve had the possibility to travel and experience different Asian cultures. I’m glad that we still have some time left here in Kuala Lumpur, but at the same time I can’t wait to get back to Finland for Christmas.

Practicing in Torremolinos

Greetings from Spain. I have been here now over two months and I have only couple of weeks left. It’s crazy, time flies. When I arrived, I stayed two nights in a local hostel. The hostel wasn’t great experience. Somebody example stole my hygienic materials. Soon as I started my practice and luckily got my own apartment. I booked it online from Finnish owner. So communicating is easy when I can do it in my home language. The apartment is small but quite cheap and near a hospital, where I do my practice.

PaellaCaminito Del Rey oli upea

The hospital is same than where Tomas doing his practice. So I try to avoid telling all the same things. I have similarly been two weeks in a one place. I have done only morning shifts because I like to do them more. I have been in emergency, intensive care unit, operation theatre and surgical ward. The hospital is private so there is both of tourists and local people who has a insurance. So many of nurses speak a good English or at least little. Here is many differences compared to Finnish working culture. Workers have to buy and wash their own working clothes by themselves. So I have to do like that too. I don’t like this, I have example seen when somebody already has clothes on train. Some nurse said that a public one things are different because it’s not a business. Here in many unit still write things down but it’s chancing and in emergency works already by electric. I think that here is less workers in one unit and example in operation theatre isn’t at all anesthesia nurse like we have. Only a doctor who doesn’t always be on the spot. One time one patient almost woke up in middle of the operation. I know it sounds crazy.

Even the working here is little bit different than in Finland I have learned much about things like cannulation and taking a blood test and electrocardiogram. I have also seen many interesting treatment especially in operation theatre. There was a lot of plastic surgery, too. I didn’t like the idea of it even it was interesting otherwise. On summary I respect even more a Finnish healthcare than before. Our quality and standards of care are really high.
Kirurgisen osaston lääkkeitä. Kanslia on avoin ja periaatteessa kenellä vaan on mahdollisuus päästä käsiksi lääkkeisiin.

In my free time I spend time with my new friends and explore in a new places. I have example visited in Marbella, El Chorro, Gibraltar and Portugal. And next week I have purpose to go Africa with ferry. Besides, I spend a lot of time a local crossfit gym. There is so nicely people and training here is so much cheaper than Finland. I have also got visitors from Finland. My friends were here in September and my mom is here right now. The weather is here truly perfect. Even I miss many things in Finland, the weather isn’t include. I hope that I can bring the sunny with me when I come back to Finland.
Katukuva Fuengirolasta
-Jessi